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't want to make it worse. the u.n. has said, the u.s. secretary joe has said the introduction o of more weapons industry is adequate counterproductive or not will lead to a resolution for special representative brahimi called for renewed diplomatic initiative bring the warring party to negotiating table. can the prime minister set out what steps you a cake government is taking to support the u.n. and advancing this initiative? >> we are taking specific steps to help the u.n. with his initiative and try to achieve a diplomatic solution would transition at the top of the regime is worthwhile pursuing. that is why we have detailed talks with the russian foreign and defense ministers in the last week. i would just make one of the point about the issue of the arms embargo, because i felt sitting about the european council chamber there was a slight similarity between some of the arguments that were being made about not putting more weapons into syria that seem to be very familiar to the discussions we had about bosnia and the appalling events that followed. and in my view it is better to be
between 1980-1988 with the iranians. a regime that invaded kuwait after which u.n. sanctions really put an additional strain on iraqi society, while at the same time strengthening the criminalize networked associate with saddam that really control the country and the police state there. the associated polarizing effect on iraq's communities, how they have become pitted against each other, how the regime had used weapons of mass destruction on his own people, the kurds in the north, and how he had persecuted the majority of the population, the shia population in the wake oof the 1991-92 gulf war. and so, and also other factors associated with his return to face initiatives and the use of really so lofty jihadi ideologies to return peoples frustrations away from his regime and towards the west and israel and so forth. in the context of his conspiracy. the effect that had on iraqi society. so understanding that human dimension of conflict and in particular understanding local conflicts that could occur, how these tribal ethnic, sectarian competition for power and resources to play out. and
to be here at cooper union and i am delighted of the sponsorship of n.y.u. which i am very familiar with so i feel at home for a lot of reasons and i appreciate the fact you braved the weather and the elements for three yesterday was so beautiful. what happened today? this is new york but it can change so dramatically and so quickly. i feel very at home because i have an early experience of learning about human rights. very early. growing up in the west of ireland wedged between two brothers and older and two brothers younger i had to be interested in equality and human rights but using my elbows to assert myself but as i try to explain in the book but that was not the norm but growing up in ireland where girls and women knew their place in the home or as a 90 or possibly to become a writer or a artist or a musician. i was very aware this you seem to have much more options even though my parent's repeated i had the same opportunities that my brothers had and they would support me in that. of the six years of the boarding school in dublin, i realize the options were not very exciting. most of
, if you want to continue to go down the u.n. road, down the route of international organizations, that's not a road that's going to lead anywhere. so let's focus on a road that has the potential to lead somewhere. i didn't mention on the israeli side -- i said there was a cop -- convergence on syria. there will be a discussion. you have 400,000 palestinians who are in syria and who are in a very vulnerable position, and it's hard to imagine, even if it's not a much of a public dimension, it's hard to imagine that's not going to be part of the private conversation. sure there will be a focus on the peace issue but also a focus on this, and what if anything we in the international community can be doing to somehow safeguard those palestinians who are there. i would say, with jordan, you're also going to have a public and private dimension. first of all,ing in is a signal of interest which is i think important. here the private dimension has to focus as much as anything on syria. you have 400,000 syrian refugees in jordan today. 100 thon additional since the begin of this year. if the pac
with him that says, you know if you want to continue to go down the u.n. road, if you want to continue to go down the route of moving on the international organizations that's not a road that's going to lead anywhere. let's focus on a road that has the potential to lead somewhere. you know i didn't mention on the israeli side, i said there was a convergence on syria but there will certainly be a private discussion on syria and israel. there will be a private discussion with abu mazen on syria as well. you have 400,000 palestinians who are in syria and who are in a very vulnerable position and it's hard to imagine even if that is not much of a public dimension for the conversation it is hard to imagine that will not be part of the private conversation. sure there will be a focus on the peace issue but there will also be a focus on this and what if anything we in the international community could be doing to somehow safeguard those palestinians who are there. i would say with jordan you're also going to have a public and private dimension. first of all just being there sends a signal of
freedom. it's a topic you spent time on. >> guest: thank you. the union is an arm of the u.n., has a long history going back into the 19th century. there was a big treaty negotiation in dubai in december, this past december, where, for the first time, the itu claimed control over the operation content in economics of the internet through definition changes in the treaty, and it was a divided vote. about 40% of the countries that showed up for the vote did not sign on to the treaty. 55 countries did not plan on, 89 signed on to the treaty, and 49 countries didn't show up to the treaty negotiations. now, the countries have until january 1st of 20 # 15 to sign on. in the meantime, there's a bigger, really sort of constitutional convention that will go on in korea in no -- november of 2014. between now and then is a crucial time for the u.s. and foreign policy because there are steps in many international meetings across the globe that happen in 2014 that shape that treaty outcome. it's constitutional convention literally from the icu to elect a new secretary general. by rewriting the constit
costly war between 1980 and 1988 with the iranians. a regime that had invaded kuwait after which u.n. sanctions really put an additional strain on iraqi society while at the same time strengthening the criminalize patronage networks associated with so there really control the country and the police state there. the associated polarizing effect on the community's poorer but they have become pitted against each other. how the regime had used weapons of mass destruction of his own people, the kurds in the north and how he persecuted the majority of the population, the shia population in the wake of the 91-92 gulf war. and also other factors associated with his return tough trade initiatives and the use of really appear 11 ideology to turn people's frustrations away from the regime in toward the west and israel and so forth. the context of the crusader conspiracy. in fact the fact that had on the iraqi society. so understanding that the human dimension and in particular understanding global conflict that could occur, how these trouble ethnic sectarian competition for power resources woul
resolution that gets voted on at the u.n. as we are flying back from the region, back to the u.s. on that trip that you, that we were discussing. we went to paris, we went to paris, egypt and then tunis. and it's in the course of those four days that that decision is made. so the conversation was very much, you know, the french are going to go ahead. we can let them do whatever they want, or we can actually try to shape this into something that is going to deliver people. >> host: i think my favorite chapter in the book is the trip to burma, perhaps because it's might be the most, i think, historical. >> guest: yes. i love that chapter. >> host: and just talk about what made that trip so unique. obviously, not very many people are traveling to burma at least from the united states at that time. >> guest: more and more, but certainly at the time it was very, very novel. you know, it was a very special moment, and it goes back to, um, when you look at the big picture of what, you know, my book will do for readers, this is a book that is several things. it is, you know, my persona
to protect civilians. that's the final resolution that gets voted on at the u.n., as we are flying back from the region, back to the u.s. on that trip that we were discussing, we went to paris. we went to paris, egypt and into this. it's in the course of those four days that that decision is made. so the conversation was very much, the french are going to go ahead. we can let them do whatever they want or we can try to shape us into something that is going to deliver. >> host: i think my favorite chapter in the book is the trip to burma, perhaps because it might be the most historical. >> guest: i love that chapter. >> host: just talk about what made that trip so unique. obvious that not very many people have gone to burma. >> guest: more and more of a string of the time it was very novel. you know, it was a very special moment, and it goes back to when you look at the big picture of what, no, my book will do for readers. is this is a book that is several things. it is, you know, my personal story, my perspective on american power. it is the story of hillary clinton as secretary of state and
for me. and he talks about how he moved from copy boy to semi reporter at the u.n. burrough, to covering the women's page, to night rewrite to finally being sent to washington as a regional correspondent. that is, covering new york, new jersey, and connecticut. and then finally moving over to cover -- to be part of the bureau where he covered congress. so that had taken 40 years, 20 years in new york, 20 years here. and then he said, i left the times because a new york finance year asked me to start a up in to cover capitol hill. i turned him down and he kept coming back. fortunately i told him, yes, i'm interested. took me six months for them to give me what wanted, which basically was a piece of the action. i would not do this if i did not have an equity interest in it. i spent my life as a reporter. had almost no managerial experience. i had to find an office and a printer and a distributor, and had to hire personnel. the hardest thing was in advertising. it was really harrowing. people tell me, you'll never work harder and never have more fun, and in both cases, that's been true. i w
the prophe prophet o. what the president should have done at the u.n. is slammed his fist on the u.n. podium and say, in no uncertain terms to the delegates, the future does not belong to the lowlife murderers who kill innocent americans. [applause] the future belongs to americans who are willing to lay their lies down on the line to protect our right of free speech. and we will never give up that right, just like will never give up our second amendment rights either. [applause] that would have been from our president a message of caring. meanwhile, here at home, our nation is facing what will likely be the biggest nonmilitary crisis in our history. you see, the president has resigned over a war, a war on the young, by putting a $6 trillion more in debt. that is a war on the young. that is in caring about you. that is an caring about your future. that isn't caring about america. because we have enemies are conducting deadly cyber attacks against us, and yet, our president continue to borrow billions of dollars from them. that, too, is conducting a war against the young. that isn't caring abo
. the u.s. did nothing. the u.n. did nothing. the mayor, the council and citizens of los angeles did that. and it looks very different. new york it's not the port. in new york it's also not transportation. compared to place like phoenix and san diego use car the way they do in the west. but here the bulk of carbon emissions come from buildings poorly insulated, old, darkrooms, tar room, attracting the sub. so here mayor bloomberg niche initiated a crucial round of trying to get better insulation in old buildings, better insulated new buildings more efficient air conditioning, heating with change the six from four, to two, maybe to alternative energy. paint the rooms white. again, by local municipal laws and cooperative action and private-public partnership. you can begin to actually make an sphwhaict is measurable in the course of a year. that states simply haven't and can't do. and then you find these cities coming together in the c40 in other global environmental intercity organizations exchanging best practicing and you find what new york and l.a. have done can be replicated in other p
the u.n. was actually founded. you are well aware of the troubles in ireland over a 40-year period and how painful that was and how it affected life on our island, brutally and tragically and involved in enormous, enormous scale of response from so many people. the graffiti of hatred was certainly written large over our tiny island and democracy and the pursuit of democratic ideas were an integral part of winning that piece. and the united states and america was part of that. it might've well divided us. the links for so many centuries were so strong that america is in its own -- pursuit of democracy idea license so many ways. i would call the city in 1990 and 95 and 96 when the clinton administration called meetings between the representatives of ireland and the united states from a business and political point of view. i remember senator george schmidt chilled speaking about democracy. i remember him recalling his own family's involvement because of immigration and his economic circumstances. this country gave him the democratic opportunity to serve as senate leader for 20 years.
involvement, there would have to be a u.n. security council resolution regional agreement and an agreement among the 28 patients. so within nato, what we are focused on is defending now with syria. and we would move patriot missiles down to do that. in terms of what else is happening in an individual nation by nation basis, there is a great deal of discussion of everything you mentioned, no-fly zones, arms embargoes, etc. it is moving individually, but it has not yet come into nato as an overall nato type of approach. it is focused, planning, being prepared. but the movement at the moment is in the individual national way. >> does that include some countries that are thinking about the possibility of going after at least some of serious air defense? >> yes. >> thank you. >> senator? >> thank you, mr. chairman. >> i want to get some clarification. i am disturbed about the answers that you just gave. i know that general jacoby, that would've been better asked. however, you are responsible for the homeland. when we talk about the capability of iran, we talk about both western europe and the
at that in light of what they have determined is appropriate to the finds u.n. >> do you think there could be a scenario where you have qm to my qualified mortgage in one scenario. to me that will lead to massive confusion. >> the way it's written, this rule as it is now, morgan said is not otherwise a qualified mortgage could be so if it passes through the automated underwriting system. >> the other question i have -- this may be on the taxpayer protection issue. and i only have like a man left. it's very complicated. in my opening statement i talked about 187 billion or ever the exact figure is and then we talked about the over nine and a half billion in net income. what does that figure actually go to? does it ever touch that 1,807,000,000,000? will it ever if it takes -- keeps generating profits? i guess, the taxpayers ever going to get the money back. >> the amount the taxpayers have put and with regard side covering losses of fannie and freddie is not being, with that amount, is not being reduced and cities dividend payments. the taxpayer is getting back to return on the capital. a d
affect whether there's a reasonable expectation of privacy under the fourth amendment? first u.n. menu. >> eight days. we have a case involving thermal imaging where we needed a warrant for at least a search for officers to look in and see intimate details. one concern i have is an open question as to drones to fly around and not feed images to law-enforcement, they just detect chemicals are scanned for unusual patterns, under the dog sniffing cases, given they are only looking for evidence of illegally to be under the constitution is an open question and one that's key to very well. >> ms. stepanovich. >> jones definitely will impact an individual expectation of privacy. in regard to the chemical sniffers that mr. calo discuss tremendous technology developed by department of defense, dhs in use by the new police department and that can scan for chemical traces down to incredibly small traces you may come into contact with accidentally and people can be triggered as potential targets based on those streets. >> professor calo, private individuals and commercial companies are allowed to
Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16

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